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RIYADH – The Government of Saudi Arabia beheaded another Pakistani citizen for allegedly smuggling heroin on Friday.

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Paralysed Italian DJ takes own life in Swiss clinic after fruitless euthanasia campaign in his native country

Fabiano Antoniani expressed frustration with his homeland shortly before triggering the lethal substance

Independent

A paralysed DJ ended his own life with the press of a button in Switzerland after a fruitless campaign for euthanasia in his native Italy.

Fabiano Antoniani died at a euthanasia facility in Forch after reportedly triggering the lethal substance.

The 40-year-old had campaigned for a change in the assisted suicide law in his homeland, but Italy's parliament had shelved the debate 11 times.

Former MEP and activist Marco Cappato, who travelled with Mr Antoniani to Switzerland, could face criminal charges after helping escort the musician to the facility.

Police have questioned him over the death, he said on Twitter.

Mr Antoniani was left blind and tetraplegic by car crash in 2014. The DJ dropped his phone while driving and smashed into the car in front of him as he tried to pick it up.

Also known as quadriplegia, Tetraplegia is paralysis caused by illness or injury that results in the partial or total loss of use of all four limbs and torso.

He appealed to Italy President Sergio Mattarella for the right to die, and shortly before his death, criticised the country for failing to pass laws allowing him to do so.

“Finally I am in Switzerland and, unfortunately, I got here on my own and not with the help of my country,” he said, in a message posted on social media shortly before his death.

“Fabo died at 11.40am. He decided to pass away, respecting the rules of a country which is not his own,” Mr Cappato wrote on Twitter, shortly after he died.

Roberto Saviano, an Italian journalist, who was a friend of DJ Fabo, also wrote: “We distinctly heard you ask for a dignified death. There is no possible justification for the silence that you’ve achieved in response.

“There is no possible justification for the lack of empathy, of attention, and humanity, from the European Parliament, and from the country, which by fate, you were born in.”

Euthanasia is illegal in Italy, a traditionally Catholic country, but the law upholds a patient’s right to refuse care.

A bill to clarify assisted suicide law has been postponed in Italy three times, but according to La Stampa, will be debated by the Chamber of Deputies this week.

Hundreds have travelled to Zurich to end their lives since the Dignitas organisation was set up in 1998.

The number of assisted suicides in Switzerland, according to statistics from Dignitas and Exit, stood at 416 in 2011 but 1,004 in 2015.

In the UK, a woman suffering from Crohn's disease last month said she will pay £10,000 to end her life in Switzerland because of social care cuts

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Feminism in Europe makes second-generation male Muslim immigrants feel entirely worthless. They will never get a girl. That is why they think that a bomb at least is a painless death.

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Cops: Man Caught in Hospital Necrophilia Act

A 24-year-old New York City man remains jailed after he was found allegedly having sex with a 92-year-old woman's corpse inside the morgue of the hospital where he worked.

Anthony Merino, who works as a lab technician at Holy Name Hospital in Teaneck, N.J., was arrested Sunday after police responded to a call from a security guard at the hospital. The guard reported witnessing the lab technician sexually desecrating the woman's dead body, according to police.

"This is a first," Lt. Dean Kazinci, spokesman for the Teaneck, N.J., police, told ABC News. "When you think you've heard and seen it all, something like this happens."

Kazinci said the security guards at the hospital told police that they caught Merino in the act of necrophilia. They transported Merino to the police station, he said, and charged him after conducting a police interview.

A spokesman for Holy Name Hospital released a statement to ABC News calling the allegations a "heinous crime."

"We are horrified and saddened for the family of the patient and are completely empathic and sympathetic to them," the statement reads.

Merino had only been working at the hospital for 14 days, according to the statement, and had passed a criminal background check before he was offered the job. The hospital also notified the dead woman's next of kin after contacting authorities.

Merino was arraigned Monday on a charge of desecrating human remains, a second degree crime in New Jersey. A judge set bail at $400,000 with conditions that included Merino surrendering his passport and submitting to a psychological evaluation. He faces a maximum of 10 years in prison, if convicted.

In addition to working part time at Holy Name Hospital, Merino also had a part-time job as a histology technician at Overlook Hospital in Summit, N.J.

Janina Scheytt Hecht, a spokeswoman for Overlook Hospital, confirmed that Merino worked for the hospital from Sept. 10, 2007, until Monday. "He has been terminated," Hecht said, adding that Merino was subject to a background check there before he was hired. She also said no one had filed a complaint against him during his short tenure on the staff.

Necrophilia is a psychological condition that falls under the umbrella category of paraphilia, according to Michael Fogel, the chair of the forensic psychology department at the Chicago School of Professional Psychology. Paraphilia involves fantasies and sexual urges in which people are aroused by nonhuman objects or pain or humiliation of oneself or a sexual partner.

"It's an extraordinarily rare condition, but it's also a very real condition," said Fogel, who previously served as the director of the Sex Offender Evaluation Unit for the Illinois Department of Corrections. In more than 1,500 evaluations he performed in that role, he said, not one involved the condition of necrophilia.

Fogel said the psychological exam will be critical to understanding what type of risk Merino may pose. He also cautioned against simply calling the suspect, if he is, in fact, convicted of the crime, "nuts."

"In these type of cases, it's a sexual attraction that the individual has," he said. "That's what they're aroused to, it's what they have sexual fantasies about."

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Khmer Rouge terror in Cambodia

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Guys Are Injecting Botox Into Their Balls

John Perez first heard about Botox for your ball sack—colloquially referred to as Scrotox—from some friends who had had it done, and liked the results. "It’s popular in Europe," Perez said, rather casually, admitting that he first encountered it over dinner at a friend's house, around six months before he decided to have the procedure himself, in late-November. "I was interested in it because my friends were excited about it, talking about it."

Testicular Botox has many purported benefits, like as a treatment of excessive sweating, the same way the neurotoxin is used in underarms and on palms. But its growing popularity is due to men who are employing it for aesthetic reasons, specifically to smooth out wrinkles on their testes and make them look bigger. And then there's this: "The most interesting part to me is that it would improve my sex life," says Perez, a 35-year-old working in the fashion industry. "That it would make everything more sensitive."

"People are definitely asking about it, talking about it" says Dr. Evan Rieder, a board-certified cosmetic dermatologist and psychiatrist at NYU Langone Medical Center. In fact, Dr. Rieder first reached out to me, saying he had seen a noticeable uptick in men inquiring about the procedure. "Dave Chappelle was talking about smoothing out the scrotum ten years ago," he says. "It's not a novel concept, but it's new in that people are actually doing it." Dr. Rieder has been approached by men over the last six months or so, and while it still may be rare, he says that colleagues in urology seem to be encountering clients interested in the procedure with more frequency. One of those urologists is Dr. Seth Cohen, a colleague at NYU Langone Medical Center, confirms the sudden interest and traces it back to a British newspaper article, extolling the procedure's benefits to men. While the numbers of men talking about it and having it done, remain small, it's a jump from the previous number: zero.

As plastic surgery becomes normalized (there was a reported 337% increase in male procedures between 2000 and 2015) many consider going under the knife more like grooming upkeep rather than some taboo treatment. This has led to more niche, specific forms of these cosmetic procedures surfacing as options. "Especially over the past couple of years, men have become more comfortable asking—not only dermatologists but plastic surgeons and urologists—about the appearance of their bodies, including the penis and scrotum."

The procedure is relatively simple: Doctor's apply a topical cream to numb the area and inject the testicle skin (no needles go into the actual sack). This is done multiple times in the selected area, with Botox from a fine needle, as it would be done to a creased forehead or a smattering of crows feet around the eye. The downtime is virtually non-existent, and Dr. Rieder says that it will set you back around $1,000, the going rate for 50 units of Botox, which is a small amount, compared to what someone would get in the face, but at this early point in the procedure's history, it's best to start with a conservative amount. Typically, this should provide a patient with three to four months of bulging balls.

John Perez first heard about Botox for your ball sack—colloquially referred to as Scrotox—from some friends who had had it done, and liked the results. "It’s popular in Europe," Perez said, rather casually, admitting that he first encountered it over dinner at a friend's house, around six months before he decided to have the procedure himself, in late-November. "I was interested in it because my friends were excited about it, talking about it."

Testicular Botox has many purported benefits, like as a treatment of excessive sweating, the same way the neurotoxin is used in underarms and on palms. But its growing popularity is due to men who are employing it for aesthetic reasons, specifically to smooth out wrinkles on their testes and make them look bigger. And then there's this: "The most interesting part to me is that it would improve my sex life," says Perez, a 35-year-old working in the fashion industry. "That it would make everything more sensitive."

"People are definitely asking about it, talking about it" says Dr. Evan Rieder, a board-certified cosmetic dermatologist and psychiatrist at NYU Langone Medical Center. In fact, Dr. Rieder first reached out to me, saying he had seen a noticeable uptick in men inquiring about the procedure. "Dave Chappelle was talking about smoothing out the scrotum ten years ago," he says. "It's not a novel concept, but it's new in that people are actually doing it." Dr. Rieder has been approached by men over the last six months or so, and while it still may be rare, he says that colleagues in urology seem to be encountering clients interested in the procedure with more frequency. One of those urologists is Dr. Seth Cohen, a colleague at NYU Langone Medical Center, confirms the sudden interest and traces it back to a British newspaper article, extolling the procedure's benefits to men. While the numbers of men talking about it and having it done, remain small, it's a jump from the previous number: zero.

As plastic surgery becomes normalized (there was a reported 337% increase in male procedures between 2000 and 2015) many consider going under the knife more like grooming upkeep rather than some taboo treatment. This has led to more niche, specific forms of these cosmetic procedures surfacing as options. "Especially over the past couple of years, men have become more comfortable asking—not only dermatologists but plastic surgeons and urologists—about the appearance of their bodies, including the penis and scrotum."

The procedure is relatively simple: Doctor's apply a topical cream to numb the area and inject the testicle skin (no needles go into the actual sack). This is done multiple times in the selected area, with Botox from a fine needle, as it would be done to a creased forehead or a smattering of crows feet around the eye. The downtime is virtually non-existent, and Dr. Rieder says that it will set you back around $1,000, the going rate for 50 units of Botox, which is a small amount, compared to what someone would get in the face, but at this early point in the procedure's history, it's best to start with a conservative amount. Typically, this should provide a patient with three to four months of bulging balls.

And while Perez did feel increased sensitivity, he was surprised at how much he enjoyed the new, smoother appearance of his, uh, sack. The verdict is still out with regard to sweating, as Perez had his procedure during the colder months. Still he's willing to find out next go around.

There are some things to consider, however. "I do tell my patients that it could potentially affect their sperm count," says Dr. Cohen, the urologist, noting that your scrotum contracts and expands to help regulate temperature for optimal health for your little guys. While these are temporary results, if you're actively seeking to have children, Cohen suggests staying away from the needle. For more active men, Dr. Cohen suggests being more aware of their testicles during sports and other vigorous movement.

How big could the ball Botox movement go? Well, it's incredibly specific, but that doesn't mean it could never gain traction. "This is an off-label usage for Botox, so for it to gain traction it would have to be done by a lot more people," Dr. Cohen noted, skeptically about the possibility for this to avalanche into anything bigger. Still, the procedure is new, and even all your friends did have it done, how would you know?

Perez made it clear that it was a completely pain-free procedure, and that he was happy with the results, going as far to say that he would like to have it done again, when the effects of this round eventually wear off. "My doctor was a little more conservative in what he gave me," he said. "Next time I'd ask him to be a little more aggressive because I liked the results." It took him a week or so to see any difference, but admitted that, yes, he looked bigger, and said if there was anything he'd warn people about, it's that for a few days after the surgery, his ball sack felt heavier than usual, but nothing too bad.

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This site contains photos of brutality. Semantically and philosophically speaking, the photos are not brutal. What is brutal is the depicted reality.

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British paedophile gets life sentence for Malaysia, Cambodia crimes

South China Morning Post

British paedophile Richard Huckle was sentenced to life in prison by a London court on Monday for abusing 23 Malaysian and Cambodian babies and children over almost a decade.

Huckle, 30, stood in the dock at London’s Old Bailey court with his hands clasped together as if in prayer as he was told that he would have to serve at least 23 years behind bars for his crimes against victims aged 6 months to 11 years.

“It is very rare indeed that a judge has to sentence sexual offending by one person on such a scale as this,” judge Peter Rook said.

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Why is sex so important? Because life is so full of shit, that without sex, it's just not worth living.

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Unveiling the Middle East’s sex industry

Salon

If asked to identify a country with a thriving sex industry, ubiquitous exposure to pornography and rampant homosexual sex, most would point somewhere in the Western world. But what about Egypt, Iran or Saudi Arabia? These would be equally accurate answers, according to John R. Bradley, author of “Behind the Veil of Vice: The Business and Culture of Sex in the Middle East.”

Bradley, a journalist with an expertise in the Arab world, crushes the popular perception of the Middle East as erotically stifled, and the West as the land of sexual expression and freedom. The more nuanced truth, he says, is that these seemingly oppositional cultures have far more in common than we often admit: Both “live under rulers who, under different pretexts and with varying degrees of severity, seek to curb the unruly sex urge as a way of maintaining social control.” There is also a shared “gap between propaganda and reality” and “a vast gulf between public and private morality,” he argues. This fascinating and comprehensive book guides readers through the seedy underbelly of the Middle East — from prostitution in Bahrain to temporary marriages in Iran — but it is just as much a reflection on Western sexual mores.

I recently spoke with Bradley about child brides, temporary marriage and Islamic feminist perspectives on the sex industry.

You frame your book as a look at the cultural sexual similarities between Arabs and Westerners. Can you explain that?

The supposed licentiousness of the West is forever being contrasted, to my mind, in wholly spurious ways, with a sexually barren Middle East. “Behind the Veil of Vice” undermines stereotypes about Arab sexualities that have become entrenched in the English-speaking world, partly by reminding readers that we still have plenty of sexual hang-ups in the West, too. In particular, it debunks the notion, promoted by the likes of Martin Amis, that terrorism carried out by Islamists can be explained away with reference to the repressed, envious Arab male who can only find release by flying airliners into phallic-shaped skyscrapers.

I’ve been based in the region for a decade, and the sexuality in the Middle East I know is every bit as capricious as its Western counterpart, as unruly and multifarious, and occasionally as becalmed. By exploring the diverse sex cultures in countries like Morocco, Syria, Saudi Arabia, Tunisia, Bahrain, Egypt, Yemen and Iran, I try to show that, as in the West, illicit sex continues to thrive in the Middle East, often in the open and despite the increasingly shrill public discourse.

What kind of pornography do you find in Arab countries?

Watching pornography is no longer a big deal for young Arabs, any more than it is for young Americans. It has become a normal part of growing up. Just about anyone in the Middle East with a satellite dish has access to hardcore pornography channels, and just about everyone has a satellite dish. In that sense it’s probably more accessible than in the West. Technically, these porn channels are banned, but even in Saudi Arabia you find guys selling “special” cards for your satellite decoder in the back alleys around the major shopping districts.

Even in countries with governments infamous for blocking political content on the Web, the porn sites are still mostly accessible, and the more secular regimes tend not to view sex as a threat in the way Islamist regimes do. The people who tend to obsess, of course, are the minority Islamists, because for them the personal is always political. Did anyone ever think so much about sex as those who want to ban it? But they are fighting a losing battle when it comes to the proliferation of smut in the Middle East, much as evangelicals are in America.

What impact did the Iraq war have on the sex industry?

The book opens with an evening I spent with a young woman whose family had fled Iraq and who had turned to working as an escort in a Damascus nightclub after her family had run out of money. There are definitely many more Iraqi women like her working as prostitutes or escorts in Syria than there were before the Iraq war. The local women in Damascus working as prostitutes were forever complaining in my conversations with them about how these Iraqis were bad for business, because they charged less than the going rate.

This increase in numbers of Iraqi women working as prostitutes in Syria should come as little surprise. A million refugees, many of them impoverished, flooded into the country from Iraq following the U.S.-led invasion. We should not lose sight of the fact that we are to blame for this situation. We bombed Iraq back into the Stone Age on the back of a pack of lies, have done nothing to bring to justice these war criminals who lead us, and at the same time feign concern and feel all superior when reading about the plight of Iraqi women working as prostitutes in Damascus.

What did you find with regards to sex trafficking in the Middle East?

The issue has unhelpfully come to frame the debate about prostitution in the Middle East, as it has in the West, in the sense that if you advocate legalization and regulation you are accused of being by default in league with the human traffickers. I found no evidence that human trafficking is widespread in the Middle East, and the statistics routinely quoted are almost always unsourced and often wildly contradictory.

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It is the secret dream of every Swedish or German woman to marry a black men, or at least have sex with a black man. Every smart young African man should migrate to Europe. Free money, nice house, good sex!

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Angela Nagle: Roosh V falls foul of the online outrage cycle

Last week we were warned that a “pro-rape group” would be organising a pro-rape rally in Naas, Co Kildare, and several online petitions called on the Taoiseach to ban the meeting. But there is more to the story than reports suggested.

The controversial meetings were to take place in towns and cities around the world as part of the Return of Kings website’s call for an international meet-up day.

In other words, it was a small internet meet-up in Naas of an obscure forum to meet like-minded men and discuss anti-feminist politics and pick-up artistry, or as they like to call it “game”.

Or it would have been had it gone ahead. Soon after the meetings were announced the website’s creator cancelled them because of fear for the “safety” of his followers, presumably against female protesters and potential attackers.

The website’s creator, known as Roosh V, is an anti-feminist polemicist who has been the subject of petitions around the world seeking to ban him from entry to Canada, the UK and the US, each gathering tens of thousands of signatures.

He sees himself as part of a broader “neomasculinist” movement, which gained prominence within the men’s rights movement of the 1990s, reasserting a strong masculinity perceived to be under attack.

The Return of Kings website is part of a wider online constellation of anti-feminist “manosphere” subcultures and forums from pick-up artists to MGTOW (Men Going Their Own Way), which is made up of heterosexual men who rather unconvincingly claim to be voluntarily abstaining from relations with women.

Roosh wrote a book series called Bang, advising men on tactics to get women in different countries to sleep with them.

Political dimension

Roosh’s adventures had a political and economic dimension too, as he had a harder time impressing women in social-democratic feminist Denmark, for example, but claims to have had more luck in eastern Europe where women are, he creepily reports, more “traditional”, a virtue one might have expected to create a hurdle to the central project of Bang.

However, the “pro-rape rally” claim, repeated uncritically in headlines all over the world, deserves some analysis. It comes from a blog post written by Roosh called How to Stop Rape, in which he makes an absurd claim that making rape legal on private property will stop rape.

The pick-up artist has since repeatedly claimed that the piece was satire. What exactly it might be satirising is hard to deduce, but it is highly plausible that the failed satire wasn’t intended to be taken literally and Roosh V has repeated multiple times on Twitter and elsewhere that he does not advocate rape.

Disgusting views

One can easily argue against the sincerity of his claim, but why was this reported as a pro-rape rally, a claim now reported around the world as an objective fact, when it is an internet forum meet-up organised on the website of a man who, despite having disgusting views on women, is on record many times saying he does not actually advocate rape?

The increasingly predictable cycle of social media outrage, followed by mainstream media outrage, followed by petitioning of the State to enforce bans on speech and assembly also comes in the context of several years of ongoing online culture wars in which we have even seen feminists like Germaine Greer “no-platformed” on campuses by the new crop of younger feminists for offensive speech.

We’ve seen the language and politics of the new feminism used against left-wing pro-feminist candidates Bernie Sanders in the US and Jeremy Corbyn in the UK. The “Berniebro” myth, that smears Sanders fans as overwhelmingly male, sexist and macho internet trolls, became a source of further online flame wars, opinion and think pieces, despite the notable absence of evidence. The best way to have dealt with Return of Kings’ squalid little internet meet-ups would have been to mock, ignore or challenge them instead of calling on the State to intervene.

Incitement laws

In the context of the current immigration and refugee crisis, are progressives really going to legitimise the banning of foreign men on the basis of their opinions? And if so, who do we think will get to decide what constitutes a harmful opinion?

Given how widespread incitement to violence laws are, the way in which the press uncritically took its cue from social media outrage on the Roosh V issue should be worrying to us all, especially in the new online media economy, where outrage generates clicks. Today it may be a sexist fool with retrograde opinions but eventually the fact-immune outrage cycle may come for you too.

Angela Nagle is a writer and academic researcher

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Injections of Botox into the penis probably are the most effective treatment for erectile dysfunction. Every artery and vein in the body is surrounded by a layer of smooth muscle. Otherwise there could not be variations in blood pressure. When the muscles around blood vessels contract, this is called vadoconstriction. When the muscles around blood vessels relax, this is called vasodilation.

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Will Terrorists Soon Be Using Weapons of Mass Destruction?

March 23, 1999 - There is increasing evidence that terrorist attacks of tomorrow could include the use of poison gases, deadly bacteria, or crude nuclear weapons. This is the major finding of a new book by one of the leading experts on weapons of mass destruction, Council on Foreign Relations Fellow Jessica Stern. This conclusion is backed up by evidence, studies, and interviews.

Sounding what former Secretary of Defense William J. Perry calls "a wake-up call for all Americans," and former National Security Adviser Anthony Lake terms "an important alarm [that he hopes] is widely heard," Dr. Stern warns that the 21st century could witness low-technology terrorist attacks employing chemical, radiological, or biological agents. While the likelihood of mass-casualty attacks is low, governments cannot afford to ignore the danger.

In The Ultimate Terrorists, Dr. Stern cites recent developments that have contributed to this new terrorism:

-- New motivating factors, such as religious conviction or apocalyptic beliefs, have created a new breed of terrorists, unconstrained by traditional ethics or political pressures.

-- The break-up of the Soviet Union has brought nuclear, biological, and chemical weapons components onto the black market and has rendered former Soviet scientists desperate, some of whom may be a source of expertise for terrorists. -- The Internet is making weapons-related information more accessible to terrorists, including weapons design and poison manuals.

-- Advanced industrial societies are particularly vulnerable to weapons of mass destruction, which are most efficiently used against people living in high concentration.

Drawing on both her Council research and her experience working with the White House to prevent nuclear terrorism, Dr. Stern explains the motivations of terrorists, points out specific circumstances that threaten safety, and offers steps the U.S. and other governments can take to prevent attacks and to mitigate the damage of those that occur. She also discusses the reasons poisons and nuclear materials inspire hysteria among the populace, and how to prevent the public panic that could be as dangerous as an actual attack. Finally, Dr. Stern discusses the need to improve public safety without compromising basic constitutional rights, such as freedom of expression.

Jessica Stern is a Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations in Washington, D.C. She is a former director of Russian, Ukrainian, and Eurasian Affairs at the National Security Council.

The Council on Foreign Relations, founded in 1921 and based in New York, is a national nonpartisan membership organization and think tank dedicated to fostering America’s understanding of other nations through study and debate.

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Of course, female sexuality is a merchandise. That's the nature of human reality. And it's the essence of culture. Because the alternative would be that men appropriate female sexuality by violence. And that's less pretty.

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